Sunday, October 12, 2008

THAT wasn't the search result I needed...

I'm talking about earthquakes in my intro class tomorrow. Most likely, I will tell the story about my experience in 1989 (sitting in a doorway shouting "is this an earthquake?" - which, by the way, is not the currently recommended behavior). But part of me would like to show the GPS monitoring that's being done right now. (Not that I'm quite prepared to explain vectors to my intro students... though, come to think of it, the GPS map would be a great example for anyone teaching about vectors.)

I've had the Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory vectors plugged into Google Earth for quite some time, but I didn't remember where I'd found it. So I did what I always do: I googled it.

And my blog showed up as the second hit.

So, for anyone who goes looking for "continuous GPS google earth," here are the sites you really want:

Google Earth plug-in
GPS products from the Plate Boundary Observatory
Earthscope: Plate Boundary Observatory

(And yes, I'm doing this because I know I'll lose track of the sites again, and I figure I can always search my own blog.)

4 comments:

CJR said...

Of course, on a more general level it's quite encouraging to see geobloggers cropping so high up on geology-related Google searches...

Silver Fox said...

I think that Google rates its blogs higher than many science publication sites, and so the blogger blogs can come up fairly high on a search list.

Silver Fox said...

For another example, I just googled "turbidites in nevada" - because I really want to find something out - and my post on a turbidite outcrop in alaska comes up 6th!

Kim said...

Chris - it might be a good thing, except that I know my students are out there googling, and I would really rather have them learn from other people on the internet. (And I would prefer that sources like Earthscope or the USGS or state and national surveys came up higher on Google searches. I'm just a go-between to real experts.)