Friday, July 20, 2007

Where on (Google) Earth #36

I found yami's ice-bound volcanoes, and although she hasn't commented back yet, I'm going to post a new one before I go to bed.

I'll invoke the Schott rule again: previous winners, please wait one hour for each time you've won. (Ron's put together a master compilation if you can't remember how often you've won.)



Tell me where it is and tell me about the geology. (But if you've won before, wait an hour for each time you've won.)

I probably won't be online much tomorrow. (I'll be working very hard on putting together a syllabus for my advanced structure class downloading and tagging all my field photos alternately playing "baby pterodactyl" with my four-year-old and reading the last Harry Potter book.) So if you find the location, please go ahead and post a new Where on (Google) Earth, so the usual suspects won't get twitchy.

8 comments:

Ron Schott said...

Somebody's been paying attention to the geology in the news! A very timely choice. I like it!

Chuck said...

Curse you, Ron!
While I was trying to figure out the time zones to see what my time limit was, you gave it away!

Ron Schott said...

Easy there, Chuck. I didn't technically solve it - I just dropped a hint to help out the newbies. :-)

Chuck said...

I apologize if my remark was overly caustic.

Ron Schott said...

No problem here. Meanwhile, you've found out how the time zones are aligned. It's all good!

Chuck said...

OK, time to put this one down. The area is the Kenya/ Tanzania border, NE of Lake Natron (thu the caustic puns), in the East African Rift where there was a recent Earthquake.

BTW, I started looking in Iceland, thinking the salt was ice...

We see the rift valley, several volcanoes in various states of decay, and of course the alkali lakes.

Kim said...

It's funny. Because I've been in the field, I've just been deleting all the earthquake notification e-mails that I get from the USGS bigquake server. But last weekend I was doing a little Google Earth surfing, looking for easy-but-cool places to have my Earth Systems Science class find. This was one of the places that I found (though for the intro class I will probably start with things zoomed out more, I'm thinking).

The volcanoes and normal faults are just really cool-looking, I think. I hadn't ever looked at aerial images of the East African Rift before. Maps, yes; photos, no.

Anyway, Chuck, you're on for #37.

Chuck said...

37 is up:
http://lablemminglounge.blogspot.com/2007/07/where-on-google-earth-37.html